I'm a nerdy, unattractive and socially awkward 16 year old girl from Australia. I like nerdy things, including cosplaying and dabble a bit in video games. I'm a mass reader and despise idiots. Thanks.. Don't be afraid to message me, I love to make friends!
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asknickandellis:

IF YOU WANT TO LAUGH FOR 40 YEAR PLEASE WATCH THIS Im cyRING

thewalkinggifs:

Comic-Con Trailer: The Walking Dead: Season 5 /region free/

luciawestwick:

Benedict Cumberbatch on the consequences of playing wolf in The Penguins of Madagascar. 

16 shades of beach - samples of sand taken from 16 different beaches on the Isles of Lewis and Harris.

madelinelime:

When I was a kid I thought your 20s were supposed to be fun, not filled with perpetual anxiety about financial stability and constantly feeling like an unaccomplished piece of shit. 

That’s because it was fun for baby boomers and they basically gave us this impression it would always be like that, but then they ruined the economy.

master-bruce-wayne:

This is exactly why we have this technology

DISABILITYFEST + Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III
→ walking with his prosthetic for the first time (How To Train Your Dragon, 2010)

markruffalo:

entertainmentweekly:

Along with This Week’s Cover, we’ve got 8 new photos from Avengers: Age of Ultron. See the other 4 here. 

Photo credit: Jay Maidment.

In case you missed it, Entertainment Weekly has your first look at Avengers: Age of Ultron and it’s pretty awesome. 

"Are you dating anyone," the assistant asked me. "Yes, obviously," I said with irritation as I analyzed the remaining radioactive carbon in the ancient corpse before me. I am an archeologist

princess-al-luka:

All the stars are shining in your eyes。。。

The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.
Brent Weeks (via thescienceofficer) ←